Computer Vision detects heart rate

Researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) are now using computer vision to determine heart rate. Using an algorithm that analyzes small movements in the head, researchers are able to connect those movements to the rush of blood caused by the beating heart, in turn determining the heart rate. This opens doors for testing those who, for one reason or another, maybe not be the best candidates for EKG testing.

Computer Vision sees faces in the clouds

Image courtesy of Shinseungback Kimyonghun
Image courtesy of Shinseungback Kimyonghun

Computer Vision has many practical uses, ranging from security enhancement to making our lives easier, but what about art?

A new project, Shinseungback Kimyounghung, was launched by two South Koreans who are using Computer Vision to find faces in the clouds. This is similar to how children often lay on their backs and point out shapes in the sky, but instead, relies on computer algorithms to spot faces.

However, while the project appears artistic on surface level, examining it deeper reveals a study comparison how computers see versus how humans see. What the end result will be isn’t yet clear at this point, but it’s an interesting and thoughtful take on the subject nonetheless.

Using text to visually search within Google

Photo courtesy of Google
Photo courtesy of Google

Google has undergone a number of changes in recent months, including but not limited to, the shutting down of some services but the launch of others. And while the end of Google Reader was announced in an effort to drive more users to Google+, that service has also seen some new features.

One of these features allows users who are logged in to search within their own albums on Google using Google Search. This kind of technology relies on Computer Vision algorithms to identify people, places, and things more easily, even if they haven’t been properly sorted or identified. The goal is to aid in visual searches through the use of phrases such as “my photos of cats” or “my photos of flowers,” etc. And as is often the case with Computer Vision and machine learning, the more photos you have, the better the technology is often able to refine itself over time.

What are your thoughts on this feature? Does it sound like something you would use?

Scramble Face service geared toward Internet users looking to protect their online presence

In a world with new computer vision-related software being introduced regularly, it’s no surprise that many consumers feel as though there is nothing they can do to protect themselves against an unwanted invasion of privacy.

However, just as companies come out with new facial recognition technology and algorithm-based programs, there are other companies that are helping customers gain a bit more control over how much of a presence they have on the web.

One example is VersusMedia, a Los Angeles-based company which launched Scramble Face in March, with a product targeted toward users wanting to locate and remove pictures of themselves that have been posted or indexed across the internet.

The premise is that in a world where potential employers and educators research applicants ahead of time, users should have some control over the content that appears on the Internet, be it something they posted or something that someone else uploaded.

Users who register with Scramble Face will upload pictures, and then pay for a 90-day period. During this time, the program continually scans the Internet for photos matching the individual, and provides a website name and number of pictures matched on each particular site.

What remains to be seen is whether the site helps with the removal process of identified photos, or simply makes users aware of images that exist, leaving them to deal with it on their own.

Image recognition used with Instagram, other social media sites

starbucksInstagram users threw a fit late last year when the popular photo app announced its new terms of services, many which users felt were a violation of privacy.

The main thing users took issue with was the ownership of photos, that is, if Instagram is allowed to take photos from its users and re-appropriate them as the company sees fit.

But what many people don’t realize is that their photos are already being used in the marketing and advertising worlds. Just consider gazeMetrix, a startup that uses computer vision and machine learning when sorting through photos on social media platforms, in order to recognize brand logos and trademarks being photographed.

In finding the use and appearance of these logos, companies are then able to promote their brands more effectively by targeting ads to the proper markets, see how these items are being used, and communicate to users of their specific products.

An article on Forbes.com provides examples of the many ways this data can be used. What are some other potential uses?

Computer vision algorithm helps identify tumors

Image courtesy of Berkeley Labs
Image courtesy of Berkeley Labs

Add cancer to the list of medical problems computer vision can be used in diagnosing and treating.

At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, researchers have created a program that analyzes images of tumors (of which there are thousands, stored in the database of The Cancer Genome Atlas project). This program relies on an algorithm that sorts through image sets and helps identify tumor subtypes – a process which is not so easy considering no two tumors are alike.

After sorting through the images, it categorizes them according to subtype and composition of organizational structure, and then matches those things up with clinical data that give an idea of how a patient affected with a certain tumor will react to treatment.

For more on what this program can do and how it can be used, see the press release here.

 

Computer vision “textbook” for high school students

Computer Vision can seem like a daunting field to those not familiar with it. However, the University of Canterbury in New Zealand has created an online, interactive “textbook” geared at teaching high school students more about this creative, emerging field.

Just watch this video to see how easy explaining Computer Vision can be and how applicable it is in our everyday lives.

Computer Science Field Guide: Computer Vision from Tim Bell on Vimeo.

Infrared camera aimed at individuals drunk in public

Photo courtesy of flickr user _sml

Although talk of facial recognition has been aimed at finding people guilty of alleged crimes or recognizing individuals for industry-related purposes, a new use has been found for this technology: identifying drunk people.

A paper published in the International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics discusses a new infrared-camera algorithm developed at the University of Patras in Greece. It focuses on the heat dispersion on the faces of people in a crowd, paying attention to where blood vessels dilate at the skin’s surface. Drunk individuals tend to have more heat on their noses and less on their foreheads, information that could be beneficial to law enforcement officers in the field who are trying to detect from afar whether or not someone is under the influence of alcohol.

This blog is sponsored by ImageGraphicsVideo, a company offering ComputerVision Software Development Services.

Smartphone app designed to alert drivers of dangers on the road

Image courtesy of Carlos S. Pereyra

Researchers at Dartmouth have come out with a new app for smartphones that works to detect dangerous driving behavior, in an effort to make roads safer. An article on NewScientist featured the app, CarSafe, explaining how it uses dual-cameras to watch the actions of both the drivers on the road and the driver of the vehicle it is in.

After mounting it in the vehicle, computer-vision technology works to take real-time information and process it, with the ability to detect if a driver is becoming drowsy or distracted, as well as to see if the vehicle or other vehicles are swerving, crossing over the lanes, or coming too close to other cars.

If any of the above occur, an alarm that is both audible and visible goes off on the phone.

What makes this app particularly unique is the fact that smartphones are not capable of using both cameras at once. However, CarSafe is written so that the two cameras are constantly switching back and forth, analyzing the scenes at a rate of eight frames per second. This does cause a delay in real-time processing, but it’s the closest anything has come to this kind of dual-camera technology, thus far.

Learn more by watching the following video:

This blog is sponsored by ImageGraphicsVideo, a company offering ComputerVision Software Development Services.

 

Genetic screening in worms made easier

Researchers at Georgia Tech have developed technology that can detect and determine differences between worms used in genetic research.

According to the recently published findings, worms are one of many tiny multi-cellular living beings that act as effective test subjects for researching genetics.

Using artificial intelligence–combined with advanced image processing–scientists are able to inspect and process these worms–known as Caenorhabditis elegans–more quickly and efficiently than in the past. With a camera that records 3D images of worms and compares them against a model of abnormal worms, the machine can not only tell the difference, but learns from it, teaching itself as it goes.

Picking out distinct factors better than humans can on their own, this technology highlights genetic mutations between the worms, which can be a key for unlocking further advances in genetic research and testing in humans in years to come.