Determining familial matches with Facial Recognition

Photo courtesy of UCF
Photo courtesy of UCF

Last month, researchers at the University of Central Florida presented a new facial recognition tool at the IEEE Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition conference in Columbus, Ohio. 

While there is no shortage of facial recognition tools used by companies and governments the world over, this one is unique in that its aim is to unite or reunite children with their biological parents.

The university’s Center for Research in Computer Vision initially got to work by creating a database of more than 10,000 images of famous people–such as politicians and celebrities–and their children.

It works by using a specially designed algorithm that breaks the face down into sections, and using various facial parts as comparisons; they are then sorted according to which matches are the most likely.

Though software for this purpose already exists, this tool was anywhere from 3 to 10 percent better than those programs, and it naturally surpasses the recognition capabilities of humans, who base their decisions on appearance rather than the actual science of it. It also reaffirmed the fact that sons resemble their fathers more than their mothers, and daughters resemble their mothers more than their fathers.

What other ways could this tool be useful?

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Residents enter their buildings using Facial Recognition

Image courtesy of FST21
Image courtesy of FST21

Apartment living has its pros and cons, but one thing many renters can relate to is having to call a locksmith and pay high fees for replacing lost or forgotten keys. However, residents at Manhattan’s Knickerbocker Village don’t have to worry about that.

The 12-building complex, home to 1,600 apartments, recently installed the FST21 SafeRise system.

How it works is that residents are photographed, with a series of body measurements and movements also recorded. This information is then stored in a system that recognizes the residents when they approach an entrance, immediately allowing them to enter.

In addition to the facial recognition technology, the system also includes a ‘digital doorman’ that allows visitors to contract residents via an intercom, or contact the security desk to ask permission to enter.

What are your thoughts on this technology? Would you feel safer knowing your building used facial recognition?

VISAPP Computer Vision conference extends submission deadline

VISAPP_2014_conference_logoComputer Vision is an interesting kind of technology in many ways, but perhaps one of the most notable things about it is how applicable it is and can be in our every day lives. And although it’s not necessarily a “new” field, it is something that is gaining popularity and recognition in the lives of “normal” people, meaning those who are not scientists, researchers, programmers, etc.

At the start of next year, Lisbon, Portugal will play host to a conference on this very topic, which highlights the work being done in the field and the emerging technologies that can help Computer Vision help people. Currently, VISAPP 2014, the 9th International Conference on Computer Vision Theory and Applications, is accepting paper submissions for the conference, with its submission deadline having been extended until September 18.

Computer Vision sees faces in the clouds

Image courtesy of Shinseungback Kimyonghun
Image courtesy of Shinseungback Kimyonghun

Computer Vision has many practical uses, ranging from security enhancement to making our lives easier, but what about art?

A new project, Shinseungback Kimyounghung, was launched by two South Koreans who are using Computer Vision to find faces in the clouds. This is similar to how children often lay on their backs and point out shapes in the sky, but instead, relies on computer algorithms to spot faces.

However, while the project appears artistic on surface level, examining it deeper reveals a study comparison how computers see versus how humans see. What the end result will be isn’t yet clear at this point, but it’s an interesting and thoughtful take on the subject nonetheless.

Using text to visually search within Google

Photo courtesy of Google
Photo courtesy of Google

Google has undergone a number of changes in recent months, including but not limited to, the shutting down of some services but the launch of others. And while the end of Google Reader was announced in an effort to drive more users to Google+, that service has also seen some new features.

One of these features allows users who are logged in to search within their own albums on Google using Google Search. This kind of technology relies on Computer Vision algorithms to identify people, places, and things more easily, even if they haven’t been properly sorted or identified. The goal is to aid in visual searches through the use of phrases such as “my photos of cats” or “my photos of flowers,” etc. And as is often the case with Computer Vision and machine learning, the more photos you have, the better the technology is often able to refine itself over time.

What are your thoughts on this feature? Does it sound like something you would use?

Makeup can mask facial recognition

004795_10_fig2As advancements in facial recognition are made, many people have become increasingly worried about protecting or maintaining their privacy. And while there are ways to hide or obscure a face, it has been thought by many that makeup wasn’t enough to fool that cameras.

However, researchers in Michigan and West Virginia have set out to disprove such an idea, demonstrating how makeup actually can change the appearance of an individual. While the way someone’s head is held, the expressions he or she may make, and the lighting don’t confuse computers, things such as natural aging or face-altering methods like plastic surgery can. Now, makeup can be added to the list.

This is because makeup can change the shape and texture of a face, by playing natural contours of the face up or down, changing the appearance of the quality and size of certain features, and even camouflaging identifying marks, including scars, birth marks, moles, or tattoos. Of course not a simple application of makeup is enough to do the rick, but heavy layers of makeup can be.

To find out more about this study and its aims, refer to an article on the subject that describes it in further detail.