Image Recognition allows fish to navigate

There are countless practical applications of Image Recognition technology, but for every helpful use, there are plenty of “just because” utilizations of ComputerVision. One such example comes from Studio Diip, a Dutch company that has worked on projects ranging from vegetable recognition to automated card recognition, and which has used technology to allow fish in a tank to navigate a vehicle.

How does it work? In short, a camera positioned on the fish watches it swimming in its tank, analyzes this movement to determine the direction it is going, and then directs a car (mounted to the tank) to head in that direction. It’s not much of a scientific breakthrough, but it’s a fun idea.

How might this technology be applied in other ways? In what way can ComputerVision help improve your product?

ComputerVision steps up soldiers’ game

Photo by Bill Jamieson
Photo by Bill Jamieson

ComputerVision has long been of interest to and utilized by the United States government and armed forces, but now it appears as though the army is using this technology to help transform soldiers into expert marksmen.

Tracking Point, a Texas-based startup that specializes in making precision-guided firearms, sold a number of “scope and trigger” kits for use on XM 2010 sniper rifles. The technology allows a shooter to pinpoint and “tag” a target, then use object-tracking technology, combined with a variety of variables (temperature, distance, etc.), to determine the most effective place to fire. The trigger is then locked until the person controlling the weapon has lined up the shot correctly, at which point he or she can pull the trigger.

To learn more about this technology and how it is implemented, watch the following video:

Pinterest and Getty Images join forces with Image Recognition

 Image courtesy of Pinterest
Image courtesy of Pinterest

Since its launch in 2010, Pinterest has been the center of a variety of copyright issues, mostly pertaining to the unauthorized use of copyrighted material by users. The biggest problem in all of this is that most users are unknowningly violating copyright laws, which makes it harder to prosecute them. But recently, it seems as though Pinterest has found a fix for this quandary.

Rather than fighting one another, Pinterest has teamed up with (re: paid) Getty Images, a company that owns the rights to millions of images, many of which are repinned on Pinterest without proper credit. The agreement between the two dictates that image recognition software will now be used. This software will identify art and photos that belong to Getty Images and tag them with metadata. In this way, the artists will receive credit, Pinterest will avoid legal issues with Getty, and users will be protected as well. It’s a win-win-win.

Do you think this is a good fix? How else might image recognition software be used to give credit where credit is due?

 

Counting grapes with Computer Vision

Photo courtesy of Carnegie Mellon
Photo courtesy of Carnegie Mellon
It’s not secret that Computer Vision is an asset in the agricultural world, yet it’s still interesting to discover the new ways in which it is being put to you. For example, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute published a study demonstrating how visual counting – one of the elementary Computer Vision concepts – is a way of estimating the yield of a crop of grapes.

Using an HD camera, a special lighting system, and a laser scanner, the setup can count grapes as small as 4mm in diameter, and using algorithms, is able to use the number of grapes and convert that to an estimated harvest yield. And while the margin of error is 9.8 percent, in humans, it’s 30, demonstrating that the Computer Vision system is more efficient and possibly more cost-effective.

Computer Vision aids endangered species conservation efforts

Photo by Dr. Paddy Ryan/The National Heritage Collection
Photo by Dr. Paddy Ryan/The National Heritage Collection

In an effort to help protect and conserve endangered species, scientists have been tracking and tagging them for years. However, there are some species that are either too large in population or too sensitive to tagging, and researchers have been working on another way to track them.

Now, thanks to SLOOP, a new computer vision software program from MIT, identifying animals has never been easier. A human sorting through 10,000 images would likely take years to properly identify animals, but this computer program cuts down the manpower and does things much quicker. Through the use of pattern-recognition algorithms, the program is able to match up stripes and spots on an animal and return 20 images that are likely matches, giving researchers a much smaller and more accurate pool to work with. Then the researchers turn to crowdsourcing, and with the aid of adept pattern-matchers, are able to narrow things down even more, resulting in 97% accuracy. This will allow researchers to spend more practical time in the field working on conversation efforts instead of wasting time in front of a computer screen.

Computer Vision sees faces in the clouds

Image courtesy of Shinseungback Kimyonghun
Image courtesy of Shinseungback Kimyonghun

Computer Vision has many practical uses, ranging from security enhancement to making our lives easier, but what about art?

A new project, Shinseungback Kimyounghung, was launched by two South Koreans who are using Computer Vision to find faces in the clouds. This is similar to how children often lay on their backs and point out shapes in the sky, but instead, relies on computer algorithms to spot faces.

However, while the project appears artistic on surface level, examining it deeper reveals a study comparison how computers see versus how humans see. What the end result will be isn’t yet clear at this point, but it’s an interesting and thoughtful take on the subject nonetheless.

Using text to visually search within Google

Photo courtesy of Google
Photo courtesy of Google

Google has undergone a number of changes in recent months, including but not limited to, the shutting down of some services but the launch of others. And while the end of Google Reader was announced in an effort to drive more users to Google+, that service has also seen some new features.

One of these features allows users who are logged in to search within their own albums on Google using Google Search. This kind of technology relies on Computer Vision algorithms to identify people, places, and things more easily, even if they haven’t been properly sorted or identified. The goal is to aid in visual searches through the use of phrases such as “my photos of cats” or “my photos of flowers,” etc. And as is often the case with Computer Vision and machine learning, the more photos you have, the better the technology is often able to refine itself over time.

What are your thoughts on this feature? Does it sound like something you would use?

Robots discovering objects through Computer Vision

herbrobotWhile having a personal robot ala Judy in the television show, the Jetson’s, may have been the dream of every child, now such a thing is closer to becoming a reality.

Meet HERB, a Home-Exploring Robot Butler created by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, as part of the Lifelong Robotic Object Discovery.

The robot, which is armed with a Kinect camera and relies on computer vision, has programming that includes a memory loaded with digital models and images of objects to aid in recognition. The goal is to create a robot that not only recognizes what it has already been taught, but grows that information on its own, without the database being expanded manually. It does this not only through simply seeing things, but also by exploring the environment and interacting with objects in it.

The Kinect camera helps to aid HERB in three-dimensional recognition, while the location of an object is also telling. Additionally, HERB can distinguish between items that move and those that don’t. As it interacts with its environment, it eventually is able to determine if something is an object, meaning if something can be lifted.

This information can later lead to robots that do things for humans, such as bringing them items or helping to clean. And while there is still a ways to go, the possibilities seem to be endless.

Scramble Face service geared toward Internet users looking to protect their online presence

In a world with new computer vision-related software being introduced regularly, it’s no surprise that many consumers feel as though there is nothing they can do to protect themselves against an unwanted invasion of privacy.

However, just as companies come out with new facial recognition technology and algorithm-based programs, there are other companies that are helping customers gain a bit more control over how much of a presence they have on the web.

One example is VersusMedia, a Los Angeles-based company which launched Scramble Face in March, with a product targeted toward users wanting to locate and remove pictures of themselves that have been posted or indexed across the internet.

The premise is that in a world where potential employers and educators research applicants ahead of time, users should have some control over the content that appears on the Internet, be it something they posted or something that someone else uploaded.

Users who register with Scramble Face will upload pictures, and then pay for a 90-day period. During this time, the program continually scans the Internet for photos matching the individual, and provides a website name and number of pictures matched on each particular site.

What remains to be seen is whether the site helps with the removal process of identified photos, or simply makes users aware of images that exist, leaving them to deal with it on their own.

Accessing apps with facial recognition.

fastaccess-anywhereInternet privacy and security are important issues for just about everyone, and although creating strong passwords is a step toward keeping outsiders out of online accounts, they can still be hacked.

Companies like Sensible Vision are aware of this and have taken steps to make users feel safer. FastAccess Anywhere is the company’s newest app, available for Apple products and Androids. It relies on facial recognition technology as a replacement for passwords, logging users into sites and applications by recognizing their faces.

The idea was born out of the acknowledgement that not only is it difficult to remember passwords to various accounts, but also in recognition of how it’s not entirely easy to type in passwords on small touch screens.

In addition to facial recognition, the app also includes a “secret shape” that is chosen by the user, and used as a means of two-step verification. Users of Android devices are able to set permissions for apps of their choice so that privacy in email, banking, and social media is preserved, while gaming is still accessible by other uses the phone or device.