Computer vision system saves drowning man

800px-Cairns_LagoonWhile there is a lot of talk about the ways computer vision can save lives, in some instances, it is already doing just that.

Last month, a computer vision drowning detection system, known as Poseidon, saved a man in Australia from drowning after an epileptic seizure caused him to sink to the bottom of a pool.

And he wasn’t the first, either. In total, 25 people were saved as a result of this system being implemented in pools.

Currently, Poseidon is in more than 220 pools across America, Europe, Japan, and now Australia.

According to the company, “the Poseidon system is based on a network of overhead or underwater cameras connected to a computer equipped with the Poseidon software [that] analyzes the trajectories of the swimmers and sends an alert to lifegards when a swimmer is in trouble.”

Scramble Face service geared toward Internet users looking to protect their online presence

In a world with new computer vision-related software being introduced regularly, it’s no surprise that many consumers feel as though there is nothing they can do to protect themselves against an unwanted invasion of privacy.

However, just as companies come out with new facial recognition technology and algorithm-based programs, there are other companies that are helping customers gain a bit more control over how much of a presence they have on the web.

One example is VersusMedia, a Los Angeles-based company which launched Scramble Face in March, with a product targeted toward users wanting to locate and remove pictures of themselves that have been posted or indexed across the internet.

The premise is that in a world where potential employers and educators research applicants ahead of time, users should have some control over the content that appears on the Internet, be it something they posted or something that someone else uploaded.

Users who register with Scramble Face will upload pictures, and then pay for a 90-day period. During this time, the program continually scans the Internet for photos matching the individual, and provides a website name and number of pictures matched on each particular site.

What remains to be seen is whether the site helps with the removal process of identified photos, or simply makes users aware of images that exist, leaving them to deal with it on their own.

Accessing apps with facial recognition.

fastaccess-anywhereInternet privacy and security are important issues for just about everyone, and although creating strong passwords is a step toward keeping outsiders out of online accounts, they can still be hacked.

Companies like Sensible Vision are aware of this and have taken steps to make users feel safer. FastAccess Anywhere is the company’s newest app, available for Apple products and Androids. It relies on facial recognition technology as a replacement for passwords, logging users into sites and applications by recognizing their faces.

The idea was born out of the acknowledgement that not only is it difficult to remember passwords to various accounts, but also in recognition of how it’s not entirely easy to type in passwords on small touch screens.

In addition to facial recognition, the app also includes a “secret shape” that is chosen by the user, and used as a means of two-step verification. Users of Android devices are able to set permissions for apps of their choice so that privacy in email, banking, and social media is preserved, while gaming is still accessible by other uses the phone or device.

Image recognition used with Instagram, other social media sites

starbucksInstagram users threw a fit late last year when the popular photo app announced its new terms of services, many which users felt were a violation of privacy.

The main thing users took issue with was the ownership of photos, that is, if Instagram is allowed to take photos from its users and re-appropriate them as the company sees fit.

But what many people don’t realize is that their photos are already being used in the marketing and advertising worlds. Just consider gazeMetrix, a startup that uses computer vision and machine learning when sorting through photos on social media platforms, in order to recognize brand logos and trademarks being photographed.

In finding the use and appearance of these logos, companies are then able to promote their brands more effectively by targeting ads to the proper markets, see how these items are being used, and communicate to users of their specific products.

An article on Forbes.com provides examples of the many ways this data can be used. What are some other potential uses?

Facial recognition aids immigration crackdown in Australia

Image courtesy of australiantest.com
Image courtesy of australiantest.com

Illegal workers seem to be a given in various industries around the world, but now Australia has begun cracking own on those looking to exploit the system. How? With computer vision, of course.

Immigration officials in the land down under are using facial recognition software to identify people who have either created new identities or stolen those of legitimate persons in order to obtain employment.

In a recent raid on farm workers, six illegal persons were detained for over-staying their visas and working. This kind of capture not only causes problems for the illegal person, but also for the employers, who can be charges up to $66,000 for each illegal worker. Specific detail about what kind of programs are being used was not provided, but could entail collaborating with state and federal agency databases in Australia and abroad.

 

Computer vision “textbook” for high school students

Computer Vision can seem like a daunting field to those not familiar with it. However, the University of Canterbury in New Zealand has created an online, interactive “textbook” geared at teaching high school students more about this creative, emerging field.

Just watch this video to see how easy explaining Computer Vision can be and how applicable it is in our everyday lives.

Computer Science Field Guide: Computer Vision from Tim Bell on Vimeo.

Technology used to recognize drivers and customize their experiences.

Imagine if your car could recognize you as its driver and act accordingly, customizing your driving experience.

With a new product designed by Delphi, this exact technology could be coming to your own car.

According to the company, the technology in question “uses a light source and camera to project a line pattern onto the subject’s face. The camera then ‘sees’ and records the subject’s two-dimensional (2D) facial fingerprint, comparing that image to a database of stored 2D facial fingerprints for a possible match. A ‘positive’ match with the proper stored image means the person is recognized. Recognition then triggers an action, for example, approval of a credit sale or unlocking of a door.”

Other possible uses for this are that the vehicle remembers settings, such as where the seat is positioned, what station the driver listens to, and how warm or cold the temperature should be.

However, although the technology was initially created for vehicles, it has other practical applications. Theoretically, any kind of security system requiring visual identification could benefit from this technology. What ways do you envision it being used?

Infrared camera aimed at individuals drunk in public

Photo courtesy of flickr user _sml

Although talk of facial recognition has been aimed at finding people guilty of alleged crimes or recognizing individuals for industry-related purposes, a new use has been found for this technology: identifying drunk people.

A paper published in the International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics discusses a new infrared-camera algorithm developed at the University of Patras in Greece. It focuses on the heat dispersion on the faces of people in a crowd, paying attention to where blood vessels dilate at the skin’s surface. Drunk individuals tend to have more heat on their noses and less on their foreheads, information that could be beneficial to law enforcement officers in the field who are trying to detect from afar whether or not someone is under the influence of alcohol.

This blog is sponsored by ImageGraphicsVideo, a company offering ComputerVision Software Development Services.

Computer Vision and machine learning help farmers kill weeds

Photo courtesy of Blue River Technology

Blue River Technology, a young startup out of Stanford University, kills weeds using Computer Vision and machine learning. In the process, farmers maximize their yield and cut back on the use of herbicides.

Currently used for lettuce crops, the company’s technology learned how to recognize the plant by analyzing close to 1,000,000 photos of lettuce. When a camera relays images of weeds growing among the lettuce plants, the software instructs a mechanical knife to root them out. As a backup, the software can send a signal to a sprayer that douses the weeds with herbicide.

In a few years’ time, with technology like this, could you see yourself growing the garden of your dreams in your backyard, freed from pulling weeds?

This blog is sponsored by ImageGraphicsVideo, a company offering ComputerVision Software Development Services.

New Toyota car concept makes use of facial recognition

Photo courtesy of Yoshikazu Tsuno

Kinect has been used for a variety of products and inventions since the system first became available to public last year. But would you trust a car that relies on Kinect software to perform many of its basic functions?

That’s exactly what the Smart INSECT (which stands for Information Network Social Electricity City Transporter), Toyota’s newest electric-powered car concept, does. With the use of facial recognition and motion sensors, the car is capable of recognizing its owner, as well as predicting and analyzing movements of the driver. Some examples of this include a greeting message being displayed when the owner approaches the car, as well as doors opening when the driver needs to enter or exit the vehicle. It can also be accessed remotely from a smartphone in order to lock/unlock the doors and begin the air conditioning system.

Would you buy a car like this if it were available?

This blog is sponsored by ImageGraphicsVideo, a company offering ComputerVision Software Development Services.